Mapf of the Week (Mar. 24 – Mar. 30)

Our new “Map of the Week” shows you how innovation is distributed in the United States, using patents as an indicator.

https://www.amergeog.org/about-us/map-of-the-week

 

Image

| Leave a comment

Map of the Week (Mar. 17 – Mar. 23)

Celebrating St. Patrick’s Day, here is our “Map of the Week” that shows Irish Ancestry in the United States. Using data provided by the United States Census Bureau, this map displays the percentage of each county’s population that stated to have Irish Ancestry (data are from 2009).

https://www.amergeog.org/about-us/map-of-the-week

Image

| Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The flatness of U. S. states

A new study measured the flatness of U. S. states and found that (a) Florida is by far the flattest state, (b) Kansas is not as flat as most people think, and (c) all states are flatter than a pancake.

 

In a new study being released today in Geographical Review, Dr. Jerome E. Dobson and Mr. Joshua S. Campbell show that conventional wisdom might be conventional, but it’s not always right!  Which U. S. state is flattest?  In a recent nationwide poll, 33% of respondents said Kansas and 23% said Florida.

According to the study, Florida is correct by any measure.  Its highest point is only 345 feet above sea level, so no local view can have much relief.  Yet 77% of all national respondents, including 62% of Floridians, failed to recognize how overwhelmingly flat the place is.

Kansas? The Great Plains as a whole are not as flat as people imagine. Any mildly alert observer can see that most of Kansas is rolling to quite hilly.  When people visit eastern Kansas, they almost always express surprise that the terrain is not as flat as they expected.  Yet the state’s reputation is so pervasive across the US.

“We performed a quantitative analysis of the contiguous United States, employing geographic software, digital elevation data, and a new algorithm for measuring flatness.  We took as our measure the viewpoint of a person standing on any spot and looking toward the horizon in all directions.  We repeated the calculation every 295 feet across the entire United States, and the computation ran for 36 hours on a fairly powerful desktop computer.  We aggregated these calculations for each state and determined flat land as a percentage of each state’s total area. Kansas came in number 7” said Dr. Dobson.

Which state is the second flattest behind Florida?  Which state is least flat?  Illinois ranks second.

Which state falls dead last?  At least John Denver got that right when he sang, “West Virginia, mountain mama.”

For the complete results of the study, as well as maps and tables ranking all states except Hawaii and Alaska, go to Geographical Review (Dobson, J. E., and J. S. Campbell. 2014.  “The Flatness of U. S. States.”  Geographical Review 104(1):1-9.

| Leave a comment

Map of the Week (Mar. 03 – Mar. 09)

See in our “Map of the Week” where in the world Carnival is celebrated and how it is related to populations with high degrees of people who are considered “Catholic”. The interactive map features brief descriptions about how each area celebrates Carnival.

https://www.amergeog.org/about-us/map-of-the-week

Image

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged | Leave a comment

Map of the Week (Feb. 24 – Mar. 02)

We introduce to you our first “Map of the Week” (created by the American Geographical Society). These three maps (for gold, silver and bronze) show you where all the Sochi Olympic Medalists come from and in what event they got a medal. Check out if there are any medal winning athletes from a place close to where you live. Click on the Map.

https://amergeog.org/media1/map-of-the-week

Image

 

| Leave a comment

AGS MapStory Ambasadors

| Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

American Geographical Society Awards Melamid Medal to Dr. Karl Zimmerer

The Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal, awarded by the American Geographical Society (AGS), is the latest of prestigious awards to be made by the Society and is presented to an internationally recognized Geographer for outstanding work on the dynamic relationship between human culture and natural resources.  Dr. Karl Zimmerer, of Pennsylvania State University, the first recipient of the medal, received the medal on 6 December 2013 in New York City.

The American Geographical Society awarded the first ever Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal to Dr. Karl S. Zimmerer last Friday at St. Francis College in Brooklyn Heights.  Before an audience including AGS Councilors, geographic scholars, members of the Melamid family, and family and friends of Dr. Zimmerer, AGS Chairman John Gould and AGS President, Dr. Jerome Dobson, presented the medal to Dr. Zimmerer.  Following the award presentation, Dr. Zimmerer presented a lecture on his most recent breakthrough research:  “Giving Rise to Sustainability:  Tropical Mountain Landscapes and Cities”.

Mr. John Gould (l), Chairman of the American Geographical Society (AGS) presents the Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal to Dr. Karl Zimmerer (c) as Dr. Jerome Dobson (r) President of AGS looks on Friday evening, 6 December 2013 in New York.

Mr. John Gould (l), Chairman of the American Geographical Society (AGS) presents the Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal to Dr. Karl Zimmerer (c) as Dr. Jerome Dobson (r) President of AGS looks on Friday evening, 6 December 2013 in New York.

Established in 2002, the Melamid Medal is one of nine medals awarded by the American Geographical Society and recognizes an internationally recognized geographer for outstanding work on the dynamic relationship between human culture and natural resources.  Dr. Zimmerer’s recent work regarding the connection of sustainability and geography is considered to be central to the sustainability discussions and debates currently held across the world today.  “Friday evening was a special night for AGS and the field of geography.  Karl Zimmerer is one of the leading experts in the area of sustainability and without his work, it would be difficult to produce public policy that sufficiently guides sustainability” noted Dr. Jerome Dobson, President of the American Geographical Society.  “His work has critical and practical real-world impact.  It is an honor for us to have this opportunity to recognize such a valued colleague as the first recipient of the medal,” added Dr. Dobson.

| Tagged , , , | Leave a comment